• The announcement in the newspaper Nordlys about property tax on insulated awnings at Senja Camping caused NBCC to react and the municipality to waive the creative effort to generate increased revenue
    The announcement in the newspaper Nordlys about property tax on insulated awnings at Senja Camping caused NBCC to react and the municipality to waive the creative effort to generate increased revenue
  • Drone images from Senja Camping, which received property tax claims of 4.172 million, an increase of 2.412 million, because the municipality would erroneously impose property tax on isolated awnings and pitches.
    Drone images from Senja Camping, which received property tax claims of 4.172 million, an increase of 2.412 million, because the municipality would erroneously impose property tax on isolated awnings and pitches.
Share this page:
Text and photo: NBCC
Caravan and Caravan magazine, No. 1 February 2020

Municipalities are wrong: Can not claim property tax on insulated awnings

A news report in the newspaper Nordlys about property tax on insulated awnings strongly aroused the involvement of NBCC, which has engaged strongly in this case.

New sources of income

NBCC has been informed that Norwegian municipalities that are getting tighter and tighter economic conditions are looking desperately for new sources of income. It is understandable and shows responsibility, but sometimes the outcome is wrong. Like when someone tries to tax isolated awnings at campsites, as the newspaper Nordlys could tell for a while back.

Lack of knowledge

Those who were given the task of finding the objects probably did not have sufficient knowledge of what a campsite is. And thus, the case got an outcome in the beginning which was unfortunate. Two campsites were to receive property tax on the insulated awnings at the campsites, later this was adjusted to pitches that would be charged to the campsite owner. But, it was just as wrong, because this could not be demanded by the municipality either. In the end, they waived this entire tax case. But, here, there is obviously a need for cleanup.

NBCC responds

When the NBCC became aware of the situation, as it was portrayed in the Northern Lights newspaper, NBCC saw that there was a need to do a job of cleaning up insulated awnings. NBCC engaged Morten Justad Johnsen in the law firm Kleven & Kristensen, who was asked to help get the case settled. It has been working on the matter since the newspaper spread on April 29, 2019. In the first week of December 2019 we received a confirmation from the municipality that NBCC's view is being accepted. Neither insulated awnings nor places of installation should be taxed with property taxes.

The municipality gave in

NBCC states that isolated awnings that have neither registration number nor registered with farm and utility number cannot be taxed. Insulated awnings should not be tax objects for property taxes. There are unregistered awnings that can be moved from campsite to campsite by arrangement with the campsite owner. Municipalities must now clear their listings of items that can be taxed with property taxes. It is not always that all permanent buildings are registered in the land register for the individual properties.

The municipality of Tranøy has made such a clean-up, and this work has led to changes in the tax base for the campsites in the municipality. NBCC will hereby pay tribute to the municipality of Tranøy for the result in this case.

Get news straight to your home

The articles from NBCC will only be available digitally for a while after the member magazine is distributed. The membership magazine and a number of other benefits can easily be secured by joining Norway's largest and oldest interest organization for you by caravan or caravan.
Join the Norwegian Motorhome and Caravan Club too!

  • Add your holiday to Norway!
    The campsites can be found here:
  • Add your holiday to Norway!
    The campsites can be found here: